Monday, May 2, 2016

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Posted: Monday, May 2, 2016

Pedagogical Institute 2016: Knowing, Growing, and Doing - May 16-20

University College invites you to participate in the 2016 Pedagogical Institute May 16-20, featuring a variety of sessions with a focus on knowing, growing, and doing. Campus experts will lead sessions related to community and collaboration, the faculty role in student success, best practices to engage our students, curriculum development, and service learning. Provost Melanie Perreault will kick off the Pedagogical Institute with opening remarks on Monday, May 16, at 9:30 a.m. in the Campbell Student Union Assembly Hall. The institute closes with a campuswide conversation about first-year students who are in campuswide programs and the use of supplemental instruction on Friday, May 20, at 9:30 a.m. in Bishop Hall 115. For more information, please e-mail Amitra Wall, assistant dean of University College.

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Modeling Community and Collaboration
Monday, May 16
9:30–11:30 a.m.
Campbell Student Union Assembly Hall
Register for this session.

The Anne Frank Project facilitates a kinesthetic story-building workshop to teach tools and vocabulary for community-building, conflict resolution and identity exploration that are applicable in all disciplines and professions. This workshop will focus on developing workplace collaborative processes.

Facilitators
Drew Kahn, Professor, Theater; Director, Anne Frank Project
Eve Everette, Assistant Director, Anne Frank Project

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Greater Expectations
Monday, May 16
1:00–3:00 p.m.
Campbell Student Union Assembly Hall
Register for this session.

Participants will explore the relationships among student characteristics, institutional language and polices, instructor expectations, and student academic success. The roles of students' individual and collective identities and their conflicts will be discussed. Examples of practical applications that have been effectively used to support student academic success in mathematics classrooms will be shared.

Facilitators
Angela Thering, Lecturer, Computer Information Systems and University College
Kevin Railey, Associate Provost and Dean Graduate School
Beth Delecki-Earns, Lecturer, Mathematics
Reva Fish, Associate Professor, Social and Psychological Foundations of Education

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Working with Students Who Are on the Spectrum
Tuesday, May 17
9:30–11:30 a.m.
Bacon Hall 115
Register for this session.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, approximately 1 percent of individuals worldwide have an autism spectrum disorder (ASD), currently affecting about 3.5 million Americans (2016). The latest statistics released by the CDC, in April of this year, indicate that the prevalence of ASD in the United States is currently 1:68 births. It is estimated that 0.7 to 1.9 percent of students in higher education have an ASD, and that merely 20 percent of these students will complete their college degree (VanBergeijk, Klin & Volkmar, 2008). This presentation will discuss what characteristics of ASD you may see from adult students in your classroom or on campus, how to best support colleges students with an ASD, and the best teaching strategies to implement in your coursework to increase student success.

Panel Participants
Stephen Anderson, Executive Director, the Summit Center
Frederick Floss, Professor, Economics and Finance
Sumana Silverheels, Accommodations Coordinator, Disability Services
Kathy Doody, Assistant Professor, Exceptional Education

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Integrating Shakespeare's Sonnets into the Curriculum
Wednesday, May 18
9:30–11:30 a.m.
Bacon Hall 115
Register for this session.

Shakespeare’s 154 sonnets, first published in 1608, constitute one of the most eloquent and enigmatic collections of love poetry in literary history. As the world commemorates 400 years since Shakespeare’s death, we will explore ways to use individual sonnets, or the entire collection, in any classroom to examine language, gender, rhetoric, sexuality, social class, love, jealousy, desire, self-delusion, patriarchy, comedy, adapting to rules, breaking rules, racial identity, invention, soliloquizing, communicating, failing to communicate, unoriginality, working on commission, working for yourself, relating parts to wholes, reading carefully, aging, scholarly authority, proofreading, editing, trust, stalking, theft, self-promotion, textual analysis, dishonesty, compromise, and genius.

Facilitators
Lisa Berglund, Chair and Professor, English
Anthony Chase, Assistant Dean, School of Arts and Humanities

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Service Learning in the First and Second Year
Thursday, May 19
9:30–11:30 a.m.
Bacon Hall 115
Register for this session.

Service learning and other high-impact practices have demonstrated benefits for college students from many backgrounds. Incorporating successful service-learning activities for first- and second-year students, however, can look very different than it does in an upper-division course. This interactive session for faculty will focus on strategies for successful community-based projects focused on first- and second-year students. Topics will include an overview of the theory and practice of service learning, data and research on service learning with first- and second-year students, and support considering approaches to community-based learning for your particular course.

Facilitators
Laura Hill-Rao, Volunteer and Service-Learning Center Coordinator
Lori Ann Woods, Lecturer, College Writing Program
Gary Welborn, Associate Professor, Sociology
Joy Guarino, Associate Professor, Theater

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Teaching, Advising, and Coaching First-Year Students
Friday, May 20
9:30–11:30 a.m.
Bacon Hall 115
Register for this session.

The Pedagogical Institute week will close with a campuswide conversation about first-year students. Engage with professional staff who work with Compass, Say Yes, Undeclared, and Middle Early High School students. Hear about supplemental instruction from a professor who has presented nationally on the practice.

Panel Participants
Patrick Crosby, COMPASS Program Coordinator
Stanley Simmons, Say Yes Program Director
Leasa Rochester-Mills, SSA for Academic Intervention, University College
Holly Quicksey, Assistant to the Dean, University College
Bill Ganley, Professor, Economics and Finance

Submitted by: Amitra A Wall
Also appeared:
Thursday, May 5, 2016
Wednesday, May 11, 2016
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